Sociology Faculty and Students
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Department of Sociology

Crime and Social Control

  • Dahaghi, Kevin

    • Kevin Dahaghi
    • Kevin Dahaghi
    • ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
    • Ph.D. The University of Texas at Austin, 2021
    • Curriculum Vitae
    •  

      Kevin Dahaghi is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Rutgers University. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology from The University of Texas at Austin in 2021. His research interests include criminal justice, law, organizations, and political sociology.

      His research broadly focuses on the dynamics between social contexts and organizations in the policy process, with an emphasis on punishment and criminal legal policies. Using historical and quantitative methods, his current work examines the origins and development of policies that shape differential exposure to the criminal legal system.

      Kevin is affiliated with the Program in Criminal Justice.

    • Faculty Article(s):
    • Uneven Access to Justice: Social Context and Eligibility for the Right to Counsel
    • Program Areas:
    • Crime and Social Control
  • Hirschfield, Paul

    • Hirschfield, Paul
    • Paul Hirschfield
    • ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR AND DIRECTOR OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROGRAM
    • Ph.D. Northwestern University, 2003
    • Office: Davison Hall, 038
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Associate Professor of Sociology and faculty affiliate of the Criminal Justice Program, teaches criminology, punishment and social control, and juvenile justice. His theoretical and empirical work focuses on social control and criminalization in relation to schools and policing. His current research centers on the expansion of positive and restorative alternatives to exclusionary discipline and school-based arrests and the organizational and legal control of deadly force by police.

      Professor Hirschfield has focused on the causes and consequences of intensified surveillance and criminalization, especially of youth. His past research focused on the impact of juvenile arrests on educational attainment and educational inequality, as well policies and programs that facilitate the transition from correctional to community educational settings. In recent years, he has shifted his focus from criminalization to de-criminalization and non-criminalization. With respect to de-criminalization, he has written on the expansion of positive and restorative alternatives to exclusionary discipline and school-based arrests. With respect to non-criminalization, he is currently studying the social, political, and legal dynamics that explain why on-duty police violence rarely leads to criminal charges.

      Dr. Hirschfield has applied qualitative and quantitative methods to various other theory- and policy-driven research projects. He participated in separate experimental evaluations of the impact of the Moving to Opportunity program and the Comer School Development Program on rates of juvenile court involvement. With support from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (U.S. Department of Justice) and the Spencer Foundation, Hirschfield conducted a study of the impact of mainstream and alternative school re-enrollment on the reentry success of young ex-offenders in New York City. His work has appeared in Criminology, Sociology of Education, Theoretical Criminology, American Educational Research Journal, Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, and elsewhere.

    • In the Public Eye:
    • Faculty Article(s):
    • Another Way Out: The Impact of Juvenile Arrests on High School Dropout
    • Schools and Crime
    • Program Areas:
    • Crime and Social Control
  • Martinez-Schuldt, Ricardo

    • Ricardo Martinez-Schuldt
    • Ricardo Martinez-Schuldt
    • Assistant Professor
    • PhD. North Carolina, 2019
    • Office: Davison Hall
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Google Scholar
    • I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Rutgers University. I received my PhD in sociology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2019. Generally, my research examines how local contexts shape human behavior and institutional actions in the areas of criminology and international migration.

      My current research, for example, focuses on the neighborhood and city-level correlates of crime, crime reporting behavior, and officer-involved shootings. In particular, I consider the impact of immigrant “sanctuary” policies, immigration, and non-profit organizations on city-level violence as well as their effects on the likelihood that individuals report crime victimization to law enforcement officials.

      I am also the co-principal investigator (with Kraig Beyerlein, University of Notre Dame) for the Chicago Congregation Project. We employ a diverse array of methodologies to locate, identify, and study religious congregations in urban areas. In particular, the Chicago Congregation Project will allow us to study how community-level contexts impacts religious congregations, especially as it pertains to engagement in their local communities. At the same time, we aim to better understand the role of congregations in shaping community-level dynamics.

    • Faculty Article(s):
    • Immigrant Sanctuary Policies and Crime-Reporting Behavior: A Multilevel Analysis of Reports of Crime Victimization to Law Enforcement, 1980 to 2004
    • Program Areas:
    • Crime and Social Control
    • Global Structures
    • Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration
  • Phillips, Julie

  • Shepherd, Hana

    • Hana Shepherd
    • Hana Shepherd
    • Associate Professor
    • Ph.D. Princeton University, 2011
    • Office: Davison Hall, 037
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Google Scholar
    • Associate Professor of Sociology. Shepherd teaches classes in organizations, culture, and how institutions attempt to change individual and group behavior. She studies how social networks, social norms and other group processes, culture, and organizations shape behavior, and facilitate or impede social change more broadly. Shepherd uses a wide range of methods including network analysis, survey and field-based experiments, digital and computational tools, interviews, and archival research. Her work is currently funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Russell Sage Foundation, Washington Center for Equitable Growth, and WorkRise.

      Hana Shepherd's work covers three areas.

      1. Social Networks, Group Processes, and Group Culture
        Shepherd’s research examines how people perceive the social norms operating in their social groups, the effects of those perceptions on behavior, and how norm perceptions are shaped by social networks. She is interested in social norms as a central element of culture as they shape larger patterns of behavior in groups. You can learn more about and access the data set that she co-designed and uses as part of this work here. Her current work in this area examines the formation and effects of network ties among low-wage workers, sources of perceptions of norms regarding racism, and how digital tools can be used to build supportive online communities.
      2. Organizational Practices: Inequality and Social Transformation
        Given the importance of organizations in distributing resources and opportunities, Shepherd examines how organizational practices amplify or diminish inequality as a way of better understanding non-individual sources of the reproduction of inequality. Her current work focuses on discipline systems and policy implementation in schools; employer practices in retail work; and how government enforces minimum wage and paid sick leave laws. In this final area, Shepherd is working on a series of papers and a book manuscript that examines how city agencies interpret and enforce local employment laws, and the implications of those practices for standards and protections at work (with Janice Fine, SMLR).
      3. Cognitive and Social Psychological Accounts of Culture
        Shepherd uses tools from social and cognitive psychology, survey experiments, and other analytical methods to investigate the processes of culture and cognition, in particular how we form shared interpretations of the social world, develop shared memories and emotions, and learn about the expectations and behaviors of others. She has a particular interest in the use and interpretation of implicit cognition measures as part of understanding the transmission of culture.
    • In the Public Eye:
    • Faculty Article(s):
    • Administering New Anti-Bullying Law: The Organizational Field and School Variation During Initial Implementation
    • Organizational Practices and Workplace Relationships in Precarious Work: New Survey Evidence
    • Rethinking Culture and Cognition
    • Program Areas:
    • Crime and Social Control
    • Culture and Cognition
    • Organizations, Networks, and Work
    • Politics and Social Movements
  • White, Helene Raskin

    • Helene Raskin White
    • Helene Raskin White
    • Ph.D. Rutgers University, 1976
    • Curriculum Vitae
    • Helene White, Distinguished Professor Emerita, was affiliated with the Sociology Department and the Center of Alcohol Studies.  Her research focused on the comorbidity of substance use, crime, violence, and mental health problems in community and high-risk samples. She also evaluated drug prevention interventions for college students. Her research was sponsored by federal and foundation grants for over 40 years, and she published one co-authored book, co-edited three books, and published more than 200 articles and chapters. She served as a consultant for the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Institute of Justice, the National Science Foundation, and the Centers for Substance Abuse Prevention. Dr. White organized the founding of the Section on Alcohol, Drugs and Tobacco of the American Sociological Association and was chair of that section twice.

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